Creationist arguments carbon dating Collage sexs free

Carbon dating is used to work out the age of organic material — in effect, any living thing.

The technique hinges on carbon-14, a radioactive isotope of the element that, unlike other more stable forms of carbon, decays away at a steady rate.

It makes no sense at all if man appeared at the end of billions of years.

We will deal with carbon dating first and then with the other dating methods.

Anyone who says otherwise—that is, anyone who accepts basic science—is just spreading the devil’s lies.

(That includes me.) Bill Nye’s decision to debate Ham at the Creation Museum Tuesday night, then, was a puzzling one.

Nye, “the science guy,” plays by the rules of the scientific method and accepts the fundamental principle of biology: evolution by natural selection.

Ham fabricates elaborate tales about Adam and Eve coexisting with vegetarian ceratosauruses in the Garden of Eden.

So, we have a “clock” which starts ticking the moment something dies.

A very common claim of young earth creationists in trying to reject the evidence for an old earth is to loudly proclaim that radiometric dating methods “makes assumptions” and that these “assumptions” are somehow fatally flawed or not supported by evidence.

These claims generally land in three different categories: (1) radiometric dating assumes that initial conditions (concentrations of mother and daughter nuclei) are known, (2) radiometric dating assumes that rocks are closed systems and (3) radiometric dating assumes that decay rates are constant.

The topic of radiometric dating has received some of the most vicious attacks by young earth creation science theorists.

However, none of the criticisms of young earth creationists have any scientific merit.

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